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3D and Special Venue Projectors

Jul 25, 2011 4:15 PM, by Bennett Liles


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Acer HS360

Acer HS360

3D is for real and manufacturers have committed substantial resources to bring it to the masses. Industrial applications abound, but the strongest market to date for 3D has been home theater and we offer a survey of what’s available for a wide range of home 3D projection scenarios. At the pro end of the spectrum, one of the most exciting and fast-growing projection apps is simulation and this most notable of special projection venues is represented by some impressive models.

Introduced last year, the single chip 3D-ready H5360 from Acer is a good entry point for bringing 16:9 3D to a home theater setting. Its 2500 lumens will paint a screen with 1280x270 resolution at a distance between 3ft. and 33ft. using a color wheel spinning at 9000 rpm. The lamp is rated to last up to 3000 hours in standard mode illumination level and of course, at this size, easy portability is a major plus. For gamers, Nvidia 3D Vision kits add a full stereoscopic 3D experience and Acer EcoProjection technology cuts standby power consumption from 5W to 1W.

Barco Galaxy NW-12

Barco Galaxy NW-12

For a more professional or top-end home theater environment, Barco offers the Galaxy NW-12 3D stereo network-centric WUXGA 3-chip DLP projector with a 12,000 lumen output. The unit is also suited for simulation in which multiple projectors are used for different simultaneous viewing angles through edge blending. Featuring full compatibility with Barco’s XDS Control Center software suite, the user is presented with a familiar Windows desktop with access to all local and network sources. The 2kW xenon lamp is warranted for 750 hours, and the projector’s stereoscopic capabilities include both active and passive Infitec.

Benq MX763

Benq MX763

The recently launched MX763 from BenQ is a DLP system with native XGA resolution that puts out 3700 ANSI lumens in 4:3 aspect ratio and features a 1.6X zoom, lens shift, auto keystone correction, LAN control, and a USB reader/display. The 3D-ready unit accepts D-sub 15-pin video sources, composite, S-Video, and HDMI 1.3. It can also be controlled on a standard serial connection as well as LAN. The audio capabilities include both line level and mic inputs. The UHP 300W lamp is designed to last up to 2000 hours in normal brightness mode, and the MX763 exhibits compatibility with video display formats from 480i to 1080p.

Casio XJ-H1650

Casio XJ-H1650

Casio designed the XJ-H1650 single 0.7in. chip DLP projector with a 3500-lumen output, XGA picture resolution in 4:3 aspect ratio, 1.2X manual zoom, manual focus, and a Casio laser/LED hybrid light source that can last up to 20,000 hours (warranty is three years or 6000 hours). The unit can project an image frame from 27in. to 300in. diagonal. It accepts video sources on two 15-pin D-sub, composite on RCA, S-Video, and locking HDMI Type A, while providing a 15-pin RGB output. USB models also come equipped with an RJ-45 network port.

Christie Matrix Sim LED

Christie Matrix Sim LED

The special venue part of our survey includes simulation, a field in which Christie Digital products excels. The single-chip DLP Christie Matrix Sim LED simulation projector is used in some very sophisticated simulation environments, providing 600 ANSI lumens in a native 1920x1200 display resolution with DVI and HD15 analog connections (HD-SDI card optional) along with onboard Ethernet control capability including ChristieNET. The unit also features Christie ArrayLOC technology to automatically adjust color and brightness in realtime, and the MTBF on the illumination system is 60,000 hours. To maintain maximum simulator up-time, the light module can be swapped in 15 minutes.

One of the latest entries in active-3D-capable reference displays from Digital Projection is the Titan Reference 1080p 3D featuring a 6000 ANSI lumen display (depending on lens), three .95in. DarkChip 1080p DMD imaging devices along with wired and wireless LAN control and monitoring. The unit accepts composite, S-Video, RGBHV, and HD/HD-SDI among other video formats along with 120Hz active stereoscopic DVI with no frame doubling. Also provided is an interface to drive an infrared transmitter to synchronize switching glasses with active displayed frames. The user can elect to pass through an external sync pulse or to use the reference generated internally by the projector. There are a number of lens options along with motorized horizontal and vertical lens shift, zoom, and focus.



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