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5-Minute Interview: Randall Stevens

President and CEO of graphics software developer Mersive Technologies, Randall Stevens, earned a degree in architecture before starting 3D-graphics software development company ArchVision. In 2004, with partners Chris Jaynes and Stephen Webb, Stevens co-founded Mersive Technologies in Lexington, Ky.

President and CEO of graphics software developer Mersive Technologies, Randall Stevens, earned a degree in architecture before starting 3D-graphics software development company ArchVision. In 2004, with partners Chris Jaynes and Stephen Webb, Stevens co-founded Mersive Technologies in Lexington, Ky.

Pro AV: Clustering projectors for a single image isn't new; what's different about what Mersive is doing?

Stevens: The problem we tried to solve is: How do you create a very large pixel display? The answer typically has been to cluster a lot of projection devices. The opportunity we saw was in the way the industry has handled it; by manually calibrating them, which creates all kinds of problems, especially if you want to cluster more than two or three projectors. And as you add projectors, the calibration gets more complex. The software we developed takes the human element out of the equation and automatically does the calibration more accurately than a human ever could.

Pro AV: So it's calibrating each overlapping projected image?

Stevens: The software that does the image processing solves three different problems. First is geometric correction for the display topography. Second, where the images overlap, the light intensity varies from where they don't. The software computes those differences and compensates for them in the calibration. Third is color correction. To make an image that looks continuous to the human eye, you also have to correct for color, because the color will vary from one projected image to the next.

Pro AV: Does that mean you have to use all the same model of projector?

Stevens: The quick answer is no; we can even fix multiple resolutions of projectors. But let me just say that we can't perform magic. You can mix and match projectors but for the best results, it's best to stick to one line of projectors.

Pro AV: What's the cost, excluding the customer's hardware?

Stevens: Licensing Sol Server for a four-projector system would cost $27,500. A 15-projector, 27-megapixel system like we showed recently at InfoComm would be $82,500.

Pro AV: You've used the term ‘ultra high definition' — how is that different from high-definition?



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