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Peer Review: Analog Way Natix

Peer Reviewer: Robert Plant, design engineer, Wild West Electronics, Reno, NV. Wild West Electronics specializes in the design, installation, and service of audio, video, lighting, and automation control systems for commercial, government, and residential applications.

My Pick:

Analog Way NatiX (NTX8022A) 8x2 high-resolution scaled native matrix, $9,995 MSRP

What I Like About It:

The Analog Way NatiX is very easy to control using the front control panel or RS232 via a Crestron control system. It's very simple to integrate into the entire project, and can also be controlled via TCP/IP and RS232 using software from Analog Way. This unit will take any input format — composite, S-video, component, or VGA — and send the scaled high-resolution output to either or both outputs. The transition of the switch is silky smooth with no sync issues. It also includes a really cool Hi-Resolution Logo inserter and frame store function.

I Would Change:

Any custom requirements can be engineered by adding other Analog Way products. For example, there's an option to add an SDTV “broadcast-quality” composite output to the NatiX. However, a “consumer-grade” composite video option that would be around the same cost as the Analog Way Power 1024s would also be nice. I think it would also be helpful if the unit had more than just two outputs, such as an 8x4, 8x8, or even as high as a 32x32 matrix.

Where I Used It:

I installed the NatiX at the Resort at Redhawk Events Center and Banquet Facility in Sparks, NV. This large, single-room facility, which is used for banquets, weddings, and corporate functions, features a partition for two rooms, an outside lobby, and an outdoor patio.

My Results:

The NatiX is the centerpiece of the project. The challenge was to take multiple format inputs (VCR, DVD, HD cable, and computer interfaces) and display them on two separate Mitsubishi projectors in this multipurpose facility. If you have an event in the large room, you also need a switcher that can combine the rooms effortlessly so that the second room can slave off of the main room. When two events are going on simultaneously, the NatiX acts as two switchers — one for each room.

I also needed a switcher that would scale any format input to high-resolution output. The equipment rack included two Analog Way Power 1024s to take the high-resolution output of the NatiX and scale it down to composite video. This allowed me to have two large live monitors and four small source preview monitors.

Everything is controlled via RS232 from two Crestron wireless remotes and two Crestron touch-panels that can control the NatiX from inside either room. The NatiX also receives and sends a feed to and from the sports bar located on the other side of the facility. If there's an event going on that flows over into the sports bar, it can be displayed on any or all of the 12 HD plasma TVs.

The NatiX system can also capture logos and frames. This feature is nice when there's a corporate function because the company's logo can be displayed on the screens until they're ready to do a video or PowerPoint presentation.

Peer Reviewer: Robert Plant, design engineer, Wild West Electronics, Reno, NV. Wild West Electronics specializes in the design, installation, and service of audio, video, lighting, and automation control systems for commercial, government, and residential applications.

 


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