SVC on Twitter    SVC on Facebook    SVC on LinkedIn

 

Clear-Com Adds New Modes to Tempest Intercom

Clear-Com said its shipping its Tempest2400 digital wireless intercom with a new firmware update that introduces two new modes of operation?Shared and Split Mode?to improve workflow efficiency, according to the company.

Clear-Com said it's shipping its Tempest2400 digital wireless intercom with a new firmware update that introduces two new modes of operation—Shared and Split Mode—to improve workflow efficiency, according to the company.

Building on Tempest's ability to connect up to 10 BaseStations within the same RF area, the new firmware update gives users the ability to combine three different modes of operation to accommodate most production wireless intercom requirements. For example, while the standard Normal Mode allows up to five full duplex BeltStations per BaseStation, the new Shared Mode enables an unlimited number of wireless users on a single base, with any five having the ability to talk at any given time. In Split Mode, users operate in a combination of Normal and Shared Mode.

"These upgrades bring this product family to the next level in its evolution," said Stephen Sanford, product manager at Clear-Com, in a statement. "Now we are able to open up the roadmap to the future for our customers, giving them an unprecedented amount of increased capacity on this system."

Tempest uses patented Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum radio technology to ensure reliable communications in the license-free 2.4 GHz band. According to the company, while Tempest operates in the same unlicensed spectrum as WiFi, its design allows it to utilize the entire available spectrum over time, while using only a very portion of the spectrum at any one moment.

Proprietary 2xTx redundant audio transmission technology makes it so all information broadcast via the digital wireless intercom system is sent over two different frequencies at two different times. As the frequencies are separated into two different parts of the 2.4 GHz band, it helps ensure at least one of the signals will pass through an interference-free area of the spectrum.

 


Browse Back Issues
BROWSE ISSUES
  June 2014 Sound & Video Contractor Cover May 2014 Sound & Video Contractor Cover April 2014 Sound & Video Contractor Cover March 2014 Sound & Video Contractor Cover February 2014 Sound & Video Contractor Cover January 2014 Sound & Video Contractor Cover  
June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 March 2014 February 2014 January 2014