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Pulling Through

Pro AV's research indicates that pulling cable and making connections and terminations probably account for the majority of billable hours on most system installation projects.

“It's an area that can be really difficult,” says Brad Nelson, owner of Sound Solutions Northwest in Kennewick, Wash.

It's definitely not the fun part of the job, concedes Tom Schraufnagel, design engineer for AV systems integrator ExhibitOne Corp. in Phoenix. “You get dirty, and you run into headaches. To get the job done, you've got to find creative ways around problems and still meet code.”

Nelson and Schraufnagel are talking about pulling cable, a tedious task that will remain essential to life in the pro AV industry, at least until the wireless distribution of audio and video signals becomes ubiquitous.

In fact, Pro AV's research indicates that pulling cable and making connections and terminations probably account for the majority of billable hours on most system installation projects.

This process can be tedious especially on retrofit jobs, where factors such as conduit already packed to the brim, difficult-to-cut-into walls and floors, and preservation constraints of historical buildings create continuous challenges that require clever solutions. As Nelson puts it, “Running cable in an existing building is a wild card.”

To combat common difficult wiring projects, find out how the following AV integrators pulled through some seemingly sticky situations by employing creative installation techniques.

1. CONCEAL CABLING IN FLOOR CREVICES.

THE INTEGRATOR: Joe Orlando, owner of Commercial Sound and Communication, Atwater, Calif.

THE JOB:Contracted several years ago to install a DSP-based audio system inside the 141-year-old Episcopal Church of St. Matthews in San Mateo, Calif., Orlando and his team had to figure out how to wire amps and speakers without cutting into walls and floors.

Pulling cable can be a really difficult job, says Brad Nelson, owner of Sound Solutions Northwest Inc. in Kennewick, Wash. The task accounts for most billable hours on system installation projects.

Pulling cable can be a really difficult job, says Brad Nelson, owner of Sound Solutions Northwest Inc. in Kennewick, Wash. The task accounts for most billable hours on system installation projects.

“We couldn't drill, fasten, or do anything else to this building,” says Orlando, citing the strict historical preservation guidelines for the church, which was rebuilt following the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake. “We had to be really creative in what we did. The trick, as in so many installs, was hiding the wire. You had to run in places where people wouldn't see it.”

THE SOLUTION: To wire the array of wall-mounted EAW JF-series speakers — which, fortunately, used the same mounting holes as the old sound system —Orlando's team shoved 14-gauge speaker wire into the spaces between the floorboards. “We used hot glue to keep them in place, because hot glue could be peeled off later,” says Orlando. “We also shoved foam into crevices so the wire would stay in place.”

In fact, for Commercial Sound and Communication, the marriage of problem and solution began literally at the altar, where the installation team had to mount a microphone into a large, sculpted, concrete lectern without cutting into it.

“We had to figure out how to hide the microphone, and we couldn't mount wireless microphone antennas on this beautiful sculpture,” says Orlando. Using an Audio-Technica Engineered Sound Series mic, he “brush-painted the wires grey to match [the concrete podium] and ran them down along the crevices so you couldn't see them.”

Again, heated glue was used to make the wire adhere to the cement. “I had to hide wire wherever I could,” says Orlando.

2. FOLLOW THE MOLDING AT THE BASE OF WALLS.

THE INTEGRATOR: Michael Conners, president of HomeTech Custom Design and Installation, Lincoln, R.I.

THE JOB: Dealing with older architecture also is an issue for HomeTech, which specializes in installing residential home theater and distributed audio systems. The company services many homes constructed in an era before the emergence of Sheetrock; the walls have brittle plaster covering rows of slats or metallic screen. Conners recalls a recent home project in Pawtucket, R.I. “We went through two saw blades for every speaker hole we cut,” he says. “The wall materials were very abrasive. They'd ruin all of your cutting tools. You couldn't accurately cut a six-inch [speaker] hole into them the way you could with Sheetrock, since the material would crack as you cut it. It's very hard to cut into that stuff without having to do a whole lot of patching afterward.”

THE SOLUTION: To get around cutting into these old walls while creating audio distribution systems, Conners and his team put speaker cable — almost always 16-gauge, four-conductor wire (16/4) with an associated Cat-5 cable for the control system — in the narrow gap that often exists underneath the floor molding, between the edge of the carpet and the wall.

“There is an area where the molding and the carpeting come together. If you know how, you can make very good use of it,” says Conners.

He also notes that the emergence of high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) has made some of his home theater work particularly difficult. HDMI cables “come with a molded connector that you can't make in the field,” he says. “If you have to fish it, you will have to drill an exceptionally large hole in the wall.”

3. WHERE THERE ARE STRICT CODES, SUBCONTRACT IT OUT.

THE INTEGRATOR: Brad Nelson, owner of Sound Solutions Northwest, Kennewick, Wash.

THE JOB: Sound Solutions recently was contracted to install a new audio system in a church that's more than 100 years old, in nearby Walla Walla, Wash. While the integrator didn't encounter the same kinds of stringent historical preservation guidelines that challenged Orlando's team during its church project, the prospect of drilling into such an old building concerned Nelson, who estimates that retrofit jobs account for 50 percent to 60 percent of his company's business. “In an older building, there's much more of a chance of damage to the surface or the structure,” he says.



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