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Symetrix Zone Mix 761 Mixer

Dec 7, 2011 3:21 PM, by John McJunkin

A sophisticated device with simple I/O accomodations.


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The final two pages of the graphical user interface are a matrix for zone-to-output signal routing and page station set-up. The software also has an external controller wizard to configure dedicated physical controllers. An extensive help menu is also included, and I was easily able to get answers to my questions therein. I put signal through the system in order to hear the digital signal processing, and as has always been the case when I evaluate Symetrix’ devices, it sounded great. The ducking works well, and the dynamics processors sound great too. The huge step up for Symetrix with this device over its predecessor, the 760, is the capacity to control it remotely with a smartphone or any other device with a browser. Symetrix’ ARC-WEB web server facilitates this control, and it literally allows the user to emulate ARC physical controls from any computer with Internet Explorer, Safari, or Firefox, and via browsers on iPhone and Android devices. I was concerned that the configuration and set up of browser-based control would be very complex, but I was pleasantly surprised at how simple it was. I really like this development, since it facilitates control over all the zones of an entire establishment via one single smartphone, which could be simply carried around by a manager or entertainment coordinator—this is very powerful. It also accomplishes a goal I have desired for quite some time: the capacity to control a Symetrix system with an Apple computer. Make no mistake, a Windows computer is still necessary for the process, but ultimately, control can be initiated from a Mac—another big step up for Symetrix.

I had been impressed with the function of the Zone Mix 760, and with the new additional capabilities, the device is even more valuable in my mind. The capacity to control the system remotely from a smart device or computer browser alone will make it popular with establishment owners, and I’m guessing that contractors will be specifying it for a substantial number of installs. Well done, Symetrix.

John McJunkin is the principal of Avalon Podcasting in Chandler, Ariz. He has consulted in the development of studios and installations and provides high-quality podcast production services.

Product Summary

  • Company: Symetrix
  • Product: Zone Mix 761 Mixer
    www.symetrix.co
  • Pros: Remote, browser-based control by smart phones and virtually any computer.
  • Cons: A physical mute-all channels button on the front panel would be welcome.
  • Applications: Zone mixing, paging, music management for restaurants, clubs, etc.
  • Price: $1,649

Specifications

INPUTS

  • Number of inputs: 12 total
    4 switchable balanced mic or line
    8 mono-summed stereo
    (-10dBV line level)
  • Connectors: 3.81mm terminal blocks (mic/line)
    RCA (Audio Media source)
  • Nominal input level: +4dBu line or -36dBu mic level
    (software selectable) with 20dB of headroom
  • Mic preamp gain: +40dB
  • Maximum input level: +23dBu mic/line, +8dBV RCA
  • Input impedance: >18kΩ balanced, >9kΩ unbalanced,
    >2kΩ with phantom power engaged (Euroblock)
    >20kΩ unbalanced (RCA)
  • CMRR: >50dB@1kHz, unity gain
  • Mic preamp EIN: <-125dBu, 22Hz-22kHz, 100Ω source impedance
  • Phantom power: +20 VDC, 20 mA maximum per input

OUTPUTS

  • Number of outputs: 6 balanced line level
  • Connectors: 3.81mm terminal blocks
  • Nominal output level: +4dBu line level with 20dB of headroom
  • Maximum output level: +24 dBu
  • Output impedance: 200Ω balanced, 100Ω unbalanced

SYSTEM

  • Sample rate: 48kHz
  • Frequency response: 20Hz-20kHz, ±0.5dB
  • Dynamic range: >110dB (A-Weighted), input to output
  • THD+Noise: <-85dB (un-weighted)
    1kHz@+22dBu with 0dB gain
  • Interchannel crosstalk: <-90dB@1kHz, typical
  • Latency: <1.6ms, input to output, all DSP inactive



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