SVC on Twitter    SVC on Facebook    SVC on LinkedIn

 

Coming Home to Windows Home Server Part 35

Jan 3, 2011 12:00 PM, By Eric B. Rux


   Follow us on Twitter    

Figure 1. Use Remote Desktop to connect to your old Windows Home Server. You'll be logging in as an administrator, so be careful while working in this environment.

Figure 1. Use Remote Desktop to connect to your old Windows Home Server. You'll be logging in as an administrator, so be careful while working in this environment.

I'm writing this month's column over the Christmas break where I have had a lot of free time for "honey-do" lists. If you are not familiar with this topic, it is where your wife has a list of things for you to do and says, "Honey, do this," and "Honey, do that." Fortunately, I have also had plenty of time to do the things that I wanted to do, such as migrate our Home Server to newer (faster) hardware. It took my son, Joshua, and I the better part of the weekend, but we got it done.

As I started the process, it reminded me that this task will be very similar to migrating to Vail. As I have mentioned before, Microsoft does not currently have a "migration wizard" to help us move from WHS v1 to WHS v2 (aka: Vail). Instead, this will have to be done manually. If you're an IT professional by day, then this probably doesn't scare you that much, but if you are a typical Windows Home Server user, you may be left scratching your head. No worries; I'll walk you through it, step-by-step.

  Related Links

Coming Home to Windows Home Server Series
Welcome Home! In this series, Eric B. Rux—Windows Home Server MVP—breaks down the Windows Home Server (WHS) with useful tips, new add-ins, problems solvers, and the latest news. ...

Here are the basic steps:

  • Connect the new Windows Home Server to the network
  • Copy the data from the old server to the new server
  • Configure the server (Remote Access, etc.)
  • Connect the clients to the new server

Connect the new Windows Home Server to the network

This process is simple, but there is one very big gotcha: The new server cannot exist on the network with the same name as your old Home Server. This is a basic rule of Widows networking, and one that isn't easily ignored. If the name of the new server must be the same as the old one, then keep reading. I'll cover that at the end of the article. For now, be sure that you name the server something unique. For example, if your old Home Server was called "HomeServer," name the new server "HomeServer2."

Do not install the client connector onto any XP or Windows 7 machines yet. We'll do that later.

Copy the data from the old server to the new server

There are a couple of ways to accomplish this task, but I'm only going to deal with one: Copy the data over the network.

While this can be accomplished from your XP or Windows 7 computer, I will show you a faster way. First, make sure that both Home Servers are connected to the same switch using a network cable. Do not try this over a wireless connection.

Now, log onto the new Home Server via Remote Desktop. Normally, this would be ill-advised as you can actually damage your Home Server if you are not careful. To use Remote Desktop, find it in the Start menu or enter in "mstsc.exe" in the Run or Search window in the Start menu. (If that sounds like a strange program name for Remote Desktop, it's because the command is actually an acronym for Microsoft Terminal Services Client.) Enter in the name of your new Home Server, and use Administrator for the User name as Figure 1 shows. Enter in the password of your Windows Home Server when prompted (this is the password you use when connecting new client computers to the server).

You will soon see the desktop of your new Home Server and promptly warned that you could do serious damage if you're not careful. Close this window, and please be careful.

After all of that, we are now ready to start copying data.



Acceptable Use Policy
blog comments powered by Disqus

Browse Back Issues
BROWSE ISSUES
  October 2014 Sound & Video Contractor Cover September 2014 Sound & Video Contractor Cover August 2014 Sound & Video Contractor Cover July 2014 Sound & Video Contractor Cover June 2014 Sound & Video Contractor Cover May 2014 Sound & Video Contractor Cover  
October 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014