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VizionWare Introduces 1650LD Series Fiber Optic HDMI Interconnects

Sep 12, 2007 8:00 AM


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VizionWare, the Texas-based signal management and signal conditioning company, has released its all-new 1650LD-series fiber-optic HDMI interconnects. The 1650LD series provides the perfect solution to the challenge of sending HDMI signals over extremely long distances, allowing installers to transmit 1080p HDMI at lengths of 50 to 100 meters with no data loss. And because VizionWare’s optical modulation technologies result in pristine digital signals at the extremely high data rates, the 1650LD series enables the latest feature of the HDMI specification—Deep Color. Currently being introduced in next-generation HD sources and digital displays, Deep Color greatly enhances the realism of an installation’s color reproduction.

Unlike most competitive HDMI optical interconnects, VizionWare’s 1650LD interconnects multiplex all digital video data onto a single fiber strand. Other currently available fiber-optic products use a separate strand of fiber for each of the four TMDS channels, resulting in a significantly bulkier cable. With VizionWare’s unique method of multiplexing every bit of this video information over a single strand of multimode fiber, VizionWare’s 1650LD series is several orders of magnitude more flexible and durable than the competitive HDMI-over-fiber technology.

“Our 1650LD series optical fiber interconnects were engineered from the ground up to maintain the highest level of signal integrity,” says Ben Jamison, vice president of sales and marketing for VizionWare. “The ability to transmit all signals across a single strand of fiber also results in a thinner cable, allowing for easier installation—something that VizionWare is known for. And the employment of extremely durable fiber optics means that the cable will withstand the rigors of the installation process without physical damage or deleterious effect on its signal carrying capacity.”

Until now, installers were limited to using either component or Cat-5 cabling in homes and businesses when long runs were required from digital-video sources. In either case performance is compromised. With component video cables, detail and full resolution are sacrificed due to component’s analog 1080i limitation, while Cat5, Cat6, and variants require equalization to mitigate skew, and therefore generally do not achieve full-1080p HD resolution. VizionWare 1650LD interconnects exact no such performance penalties because the signal is completely preserved in the digital domain to maintain the highest video performance. Additionally, the VizionWare 1650LD’s high digital data rates ensure that today’s installations will remain compatible with tomorrow’s increasingly advanced equipment.

VizionWare 1650LD fiber optic HDMI interconnects are dimensionally HDMI-compliant from end to end with no bulges in the cable or bulky connector heads—as is frequently the case with competitive products. The 1650LD interconnects’ one-piece design also minimizes attenuation in the cable. Because external balun transformers or extenders are not required, insertion loss along the transmission path is also minimized. VizionWare’s ability to multiplex video data over a single fiber strand while using copper wires for transmitting all requisite HDMI control data results in a high-quality look-and-feel similar to that of the 1650 interconnects currently on the market.

With the new 1650LD series, VizionWare maintains and enhances its well-earned reputation for providing innovative technology; superb build-quality; thin, installer-friendly interconnects; and the very highest levels of quantifiable signal integrity.

VizionWare 1650LD optical fiber HDMI interconnects will be available this September. They come in 50-meter and 100-meter lengths at MSRPs of $1499 and $2299, respectively.

For more information, visit www.vizionware.com.



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