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Audio for High-energy Restaurant, Part 2

Mar 20, 2014 11:06 AM, With Bennett Liles


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Editor’s note: For your convenience, this transcription of the podcast includes timestamps. If you are listening to the podcast and reading its accompanying transcription, you can use the timestamps to jump to any part of the audio podcast by simply dragging the slider on the podcast to the time indicated in the transcription.

When baseball fans get together, the sound level can start shaking the place. At the Game Seven Grill in Phoenix, the Arizona Diamondbacks had to have a sound system that could compete with that intensity level both inside the bar and outside in the plaza. Mark Schultz from Parsons Technologies came up with the solution. That’s coming up next on the SVC Podcast.

SVC: Mark thanks for being back for part two on the SVC Podcast from the Phoenix office of Parsons Technologies. A complete renovation of the Game Seven Grille opened things up for a new sound system. In part one we talked about the inside but they have a huge plaza outside the place where the sound system has to not only cut through the noise, it’s got to be weather proof as well. You used Community R.25 95Ts I believe for that?

Yes we did. The outside is a separate zone so they can actually put different programming outside than what’s inside if they wanted to. Typically during a game, if people are sitting out there, they’ll put the radio broadcast on so they can hear what’s going on in the game. And then they use the R.25 94T’s because we had just finished using them inside on the concourse at the baseball stadium and the Diamondbacks liked them so well that they suggested we use them in the plaza as well. So that’s what we put in out there and it works great. [Timestamp: 1:46]

You’ve got all of this centrally controlled from inside. Is the wiring run through underground conduit or did you have to go wireless with some of it?

Since the inside seating is all open what we were able to do is just drill through the brick wall and put conduit sleeves in and just run it right out through the wall right to where the speaker locations were. So we didn’t have to go through any underground conduits or anything; it was all pretty straightforward as far as getting it out there. And then everything just goes back to the central amplifier rack which controls both inside and outside. [Timestamp: 2:18]

OK, you’ve got a place that’s secure and I think you said before that you’ve got two control points.

Yeah. One is in the manager’s office and one is at the equipment rack itself, in the little closet inside the restaurant and they can control from there both the volume and program selection for the inside zone and then separately also for the outside zone. [Timestamp: 2:39]

I guess the input selection wouldn’t be tricky at all but if you’re controlling a sound system from an acoustically separate area where you can’t hear the output that could be a little strange unless you have some kind of preset arranged for it.

Yeah, well one of the nice things about the controller is it does give them a readout that tells them what the signal – the level is. And we’ve got a meter built so they actually visually see what’s going on. And over the course of the first season they got pretty familiar with what level it had to be at for a particular sized crowd and what noise levels and whatnot, so they’ve gotten pretty good at setting the levels so it’s right on target. [Timestamp: 3:17]



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